Histoire de l'hôtel

Il était une fois le Tichka Marrakech…
Depuis la date de son ouverture au début des années 80, l’hôtel  a reçu des sommités des quatre coins du Monde qui fréquentaient dans le temps, le Palace la Mamounia qui était fermé pour rénovation.
Le Tichka Marrakech a su séduire tout le long de ces années, une clientèle haut de gamme, en quête d’authenticité, de charme et d’intimité.

Le génie des architectes !

Le génie du célèbre architecte Charles Boccara fusionné à une vision d’intérieur colorée et joviale du décorateur américain Bill Willis ont donné vie à cet hôtel dans l'esprit des palais marocains du 19ème siècle.

 Charles Boccara

Charles Boccara aime parler de l’architecture comme d’une composition, composition de matières, composition d’espaces. Il la compare même à une composition de musique ou une composition culinaire.

“La cuisine occidentale a par exemple un vocabulaire plus limité que la cuisine d’Extrême-Orient qui est plus riche en mots subtils signifiant un entre-deux : gluant, aigre doux… Pour l’architecture, c’est la même chose, il faut trouver la nuance, la volupté, qui n’est pas forcément demandée. “

“La cuisine occidentale a par exemple un vocabulaire plus limité que la cuisine d’Extrême-Orient qui est plus riche en mots subtils signifiant un entre-deux : gluant, aigre doux… Pour l’architecture, c’est la même chose, il faut trouver la nuance, la volupté, qui n’est pas forcément demandée.

“La cuisine occidentale a par exemple un vocabulaire plus limité que la cuisine d’Extrême-Orient qui est plus riche en mots subtils signifiant un entre-deux : gluant, aigre doux… Pour l’architecture, c’est la même chose, il faut trouver la nuance, la volupté, qui n’est pas forcément demandée.

Bill Willis

Americans with a creative bent sometimes thrive best far from their native land, finding true freedom of expression only after abandoning the land of the free. One such adventuresome expat was Bill Willis (1937–2009), the lanky, cranky, often pharmacologically fueled interior designer to Morocco’s fête set for nearly 40 years. Born in Tennessee, educated at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and briefly a resident of Rome—he once operated an antiques shop near the Spanish Steps—Willis found a foothold in North Africa in the mid-1960s and never left. “My discovery of the Islamic world has been an astounding experience,” Willis told Architectural Digest in 1989, during the heyday of his reign as the king of latter-day Orientalism, a pan-Arabic hodgepodge whose hallucinatory special effects provided a perfect background for living the louche life.

When Willis wasn’t snorting cocaine (“the only drug I really like,” he once noted) with the Rolling Stones, munching hashish cookies with the writer William Burroughs, or dropping acid with the lingerie designer Fernando Sanchez somewhere in the Moroccan desert, he created rooms so romantically over the top that they recall tales told by Scheherazade. Constants in his design vocabulary included flamboyant tiles, billowing domes, majestic fireplaces, and the softly polished